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father want the us to have an education. we knew that education was to a better life. i think he taught all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >>> you with catch this and overprograms online at booktv.org. >>> in an interview conducted on the campus of george mason university during the fall for the book festival. in the book she shares her experience with growing up in mexico without her parents. who immigrate to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> what is -- [inaudible] >> the way u grew up knowing it was it was the reference to the united states, but to me because i grew up in the hometown surrounded by mountains, i didn't know where the united states was to me it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mentio
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
on the frontline. we talk about how you use a compass. what we know is that if you take a compass and you pointed in a particular direction, but you can walk all day. you might walk over mountains. you could walk through a forest. you could walk the red desert. what happens is that the end of the day, you end up in one very particular situation. we also know at the beginning of that journey you make a decision of a change of course, maybe just one or 2 degrees. then you start to walk that path. you could walk over mountains or through a forest or through a desert. what happens is at the end the day, you end up in a completely different place. we know for the young men and women that we are working with today, those who are going to read this book, "the warrior's heart", they are at a place where they are facing a frontline in their life and they have to act with courage. i have written this book where they can think about how they make choices in their life. over time, they can make choices so that they can create themselves and become people of compassion and make choices that allow them to deve
of the founding fathers. henry is an independent scholar. he's also known to many of us here in the audience who write on plantation society missed out in his last book was on george washington and slavery, entitled, an imperfect guide, which was published in 2003. at the end of his talk, he will be taking questions and we be available to sign copies of this book in the gallery. please join me in welcoming, henry wiencek. [applause] >> thank you, andrew. i very much appreciate your remarks in his homecoming for me because i spent many months upstairs and down the hall when i had a fellowship here to begin my research on the boat. i'm extremely grateful to andrew for all the aid he has lent me in support and also to dian jordan from a former executive at her and leslie bowman, current executive dirt for their support in the past into the present. this is a magnificent resource in the standard set of monticello is perhaps the leading public history study of slavery in the united states. the study of that subject is really very difficult for a number of reasons. one is that it's so hard to get the
there was a real wine. i was afraid there would be a backlash and all of us were feeling. they were putting forth the same effort they put forward for years. the prejudices and they never really re-examine what it would mean to reconsider those tropes in those slightly shifted things. and so when you had todd akin, we'll really have to think a lot about, is that religious religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents and we don't talk about how immigration breaks out families and and, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is -- it's an experience that definitely scared me, that has really shaped the woman i am today, and then also it's an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you know, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story in terms of giving people an inside to what their situation might be like and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the amnesty of 1980, i had a green card by the time i was 14. so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card. and i would really love to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue
of progress in a networked age" use the tere pure progressive. what iss that? >> guest: is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i seeo emerging all around me. e. the book is really kind of a series of stories about these people are trying to change ther world and trying to advance the cause of progress. ban but they don't completely fithei the existing models that we have between the left and the right or the democrats and right republicans. democrats and repub. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt th
>> i hope you will join us for the reception in extension room 754 with speakers and many of you here and lastly in join me in thanking darlene nipper, and rebecca traister. [applause] .. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> and now from the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas, a discussion of president lyndon johnson and first lady ladybird johnson. this is just over 50 minutes. >> hi, and welcome to the texas book festival.d my name is carol dawson, and iw love being a moderator every year at the texas book festival, and i particularly love this task this year. task this year i have had the privilege of reading two books that interlock so beautifully that it provided one hold 360-degree experience in reading them. before we begin, and i introduce our authors, i want to remind you all that all proceeds of book sales at the texas book festival goats the libraries of this great state. so, please avail yourself of the boo
and if they had met previously. woman replied they had pat asked about the stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hall way. the woman explained she was returning to indian why in a few days and hoped to glimpse of the president. pat arranged to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i used the story to begin the talk because i think it brings to light a couple of key points i wish to bring to light about pat nixon and her public role and the role of foreign diplomat. pat met the woman during her travel as second lead. the traveling she did as first and second lead was the past of the job as a political wife. second, this woman was not the wife a ambassador or statesman, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states come out first to see the second lead and come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on the travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people
for today. we also welcome our listening audience and we invite everyone to listen to us on line at commonwealth club.org. now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. marc freedman is ceo and founder of encore.org, a nonprofit organization working to promote encore careers. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience core, now one of america's largest nonprofit national service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize, which annually provides five, 100,000-dollar prices to social innovators in the second half of life. freedman was described by "the new york times" as the voice of aging baby boomers who will are beginning retirement for meaningful and sustainable work later in life. while the work "wall street journal" stated, in the past decade, mr. freedman has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he is the author of the "the big shift" navigating the new stage beyond midlife, published in april of 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work w
. it was the lingering sense can he pull a fast one. it wasn't a u.s. official. in congress and american politics there were those on the right-wing who were saying, you know, this is our chance to get rid of this regime. how do we know they won't hide missiles in caves or something like that? so -- how did kennedy view khrushchev once he agreed to pull the miss thes out? did he begin to change the view with him someone >> guest: i'm not sure. i think it took awhile. we were talking before about verifying before trusting. trusting came gradually, again, once the surveillance flights were showing the soviets were following through. they were dismantling things. they started to realize, the sowf soviets and crew shove we can trust him. later on in the weeks later there are moments where trust really comes again. because the months we get -- once we get through the -- the end bookend of the missile crisis is traditionally the november 20th deal. >> host: the war teen ends. >> guest: the nature of the deal there are long-range bombers in cuba. there are three weeks of negotiation about are these or n
they intersect with one another. i think in doing so, it gives us a history of what it looks like and helps us rethink not only what was going on in the south, but what was going on in the national and conservative political realm as well. the history of modern conservatism, a history that thurman is left out because we only remembered this cartoonish figure from the deep south. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. now a decision by five men to leave their ivy league schools and join the british army in the spring of 1941. six months prior to pearl harbor and america's involvement in world war ii. this is about one hour. >> thank you. thank you so much. thank you for the kind introduction and thank you for introducing me the epicenter of support in the united states. thank you to c-span and booktv to making me feel like oprah winfrey, if only for an hour. it is wonderful to be here. isn't it everything that a bookstore should be? i am thrilled to be here at the north shire. i am also happy to be in vermont because i have long-standing famil
are fortunate to have john turner with us. he teaches religious studies at george mason university in virginia, and his history that we are discussing today is a very important contribution. i'm impressed. it's hard to impress me. i taught utah history 34 times at the university of utah. the -- his first book, "campus crusade for christ: renewal of evangelical in post war america," it was a prize winning book. he's a graduate of notre dame. they'll be in our minds today with football. he is from new york state, upstate, as they call it. not far from where brigham young workedded or paul mira. well, his insight and balance, we'll talk about later on in the program. the other commentators are craig foster, author of two books, critical analyst of appty-mormon in great britain, 1837-1860, and a different god question, myth mitt, the religious right and the mormon question. he also co-authored with the mormon quest for the presidency, and also with the persistence of polygamy andçó mormon anthology. he worked for the family history library in salt lake city, and there, he did research gene lomin
some of the coaches that talk about us how to tackle properly. that will help improve some of the safety of the game and keep kids from using their heads. >> got you. sean, documentary film maker, you're making a documentary now on football; right? i don't know too much about it. it has to do with the central question should you let your kid play. what have have you decided and learns? >> i'm working on a film serious. i shot about 30 hours of footage and i had the opportunity to work with ray about a year ago in virginia tech, and to eddie's point about the coaching, there was a pregame before, you know, there was not a single ref of offense or defense. it was all just loining the kids up and having them tag each other. there was, you know, in my experience, watching and playing football when i was younger. somebody is trying to elude somebody. it was literally bam, bam. and when the kid didn't rise up to the level of achievement the coach wanted. it's pitiful. it's not dancing. the back of the jersey are reading animal and eliminator. my question is who is watching the pe
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14